Rave Collage

A collection of 1990’s early rave flyers from the North west and South collaged onto a perspex window from Hulme, Manchester’s old demolished crescents.Rave CollageDetail is worked with oil paints to give a stained glass effect when lit from behind with shadow hands dancing as the lights pulse.

The rave artwork has been on display at Curve Pusher studios, Mare St, Hackney, London, and currently looking for a new home for this unique mixed media artwork.

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New pop up shop for yardworks art, WA

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In Freo, many commercial businesses have moved out and  artists are moving in, and revitalising empty spaces! Lots of pop up shops are happening in Fremantle, with artists at the heart of the towns economy, they are developing new shops everywhere. So, I have been very busy making lots of lovely hand made creations for the first yardworks art shopfront in the woolstores, fremantle, wa.

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In a collective with other artists and retailers, we are sharing the overheads and using a commercial space to promote our creations and retail stock.

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Its a great opportunity and location for developing the idea and concept of yardworks art, and displaying other artists upcycled creations aswell.

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yardworks art is a mix of homemade artworks for sale, upcycled and lovingly made for your life. Lost and found art, oddities, curiosities, vintage and retro all for sale.

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Come and have a look, open every day……..yardworks art, woolstores. 28 Cantonment St
Fremantle Western Australia 6160

Benevolent Asylum – Lily Hibberd

Benevolent Asylum is an installation, performance and community discussion ground. The project at the Fremantle Arts Centre last year, was prompted by the discovery of the razed site of The Melbourne Benevolent Asylum, once the most prominent building in North Melbourne, where Hibberd lived for 11 years. Established in 1851, the Asylum was abandoned in 1900 and finally demolished in 1912.

Hibberd writes ‘The exhibition at Fremantle Arts Centre was the result of an encounter with the Melbourne Benevolent Asylum, which sparked an examination of asylum institutions as an archetype of care and confinement in Australia. Benevolent Asylum has evolved over three years, with research across Australia and Europe, to look at the origins of institutional confinement and birth of the circumstance in which state care and incarceration are inseparable.This work has revealed that originary models still profoundly influence Australia’s chief institutions of confinement and punitive detention. In Fremantle, for instance, convict labour transported to Tasmania from London’s Millbank and Pentonville prisons brought with it the Solitary System and a penology of relentless isolation and labour. Replicated across the colony in the mid-19th century, Model Prisons were established at Fremantle, Port Arthur, Adelaide Gaol and at Pentridge in Melbourne. Inmates in this system spent 12 hours labour and 23 hours a day in 2 x 3 metre cells.’

‘Tourism at former prison sites promotes the idea that this is a ‘dark’ history, which our institutions have left well behind, and that such harsh treatment borders on fiction. This is simply another radical forgetting. Confinement operates in precisely the same way in our asylums, prisons and detention centres today. And solitary incarceration is the prevailing public secret of Australian punishment: denial of the practice is so obvious that everything is done to avoid recognising it. ‘

This is a fascinating area of historical research & documentation, and is a rich area of creation for artists in site specific installation & artworks.  Im particulalry fascinated by the current use of these spaces especially for play & free leisure activities when they hold such deep secrets in their psychological landscapes. Is this an unconcious healing process or just gentrification? Certainly at the Forum discussion with the artist, issues of asylum, the history of confinement and the relationship between historical research and creativity were discussed openly and sometimes very emotionally, between artists, historians, prison counsellors, psychiatrists, educators, activists and other community members .

http://www.lilyhibberd.com/Benevolent_Asylum.html

Yarns of the Heart

A beautiful exhibition of hand made dolls which tell the traditional dreamtime and contemporary stories of the women who made them, was at the Museum of Western Australia earlier this year. The Community Arts Network of WA (CAN WA) revived the original doll making project, preserving the art of storytelling and doll making for generations to come.

For further information follow the story threads that make up the yarns of the heart –

http://www.canwa.com.au/articles/news/only-two-more-weeks-to-see-yarns-of-the-heart

http://www.museum.wa.gov.au/

Towards a New Australian Theatre Genre

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A few months ago I was very excited that Joey Ruigrok van der Werven was coming to Perth, from the legendary Doegtroep Theatre, Holland, to give an inspirational lecture on creating image based performance events in Australia,

Doegtroupe reinvented the ordinary world with their street theatre, the name means theatre of rubbish! From Joeys time as an Engineer with Doegtroep, he believes artists step out of society and hold a mirror to reinterpret life. If you take away the arts people become very poor. Artists  need space to discover and explore as these iconic European companies had in the 1980’s.
Joey also ran a weekend masterclass on creating large scale spectacle and and inventing performance environments.

one of the unsung heroes of Australian contemporary performance’ Realtime

This was right up my street, as a visual theatre maker,I have always  wanted to scale up , from small scale theatre to gigantic with the dreams of making large scale sensory spectacles for families. So I was very happy to also be invited to the masterclass to work and share ideas with other WA artists, thanks to Performing Lines.

Joey believes the director is a facilitator of process, and that you can only make the large scale work if you can make the small scale, which is heartening to hear. Doegtrope obtained money from building foundations,as acertain % can be used for public art which does not always have to be a sculpture or fountain.

 

Towards A New Australian Theatre Lecture at The Bakery Photo: Sarah Rowbottam

 

for a full overview of the lecture please see Towards a new australian theatre genre’ lecture at

http://www.performinglineswa.org.au/site/wordpress/2011/04/20/joey_perth_talk/

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Joey is now based in Australia and has developed his own methodology on creating large scale site specific and community work. His intention is to make image driven community theatre, using real life events, bringing theatre to the people in their environment. Theres no need for a theatre infrastructure here, using industrial, abandoned spaces and bringing new life. He discussed how the renegade artist theatre companies, such as La Fura (Spain), Royal de Luxe (France) and Doegtrope (Holland) have become iconic for their country, as with La fura’s giant puppet and spectacle for the Olympics in 1992.

To be continued

La fura dels baus puppet

La fura dels baus olympics open 1992

1862 Preston Guild


1862 Preston Guild

Originally uploaded by Nog Tow

Wow, what an event! to have seen the Great Blondin at the Preston Guild and this was at the time of the Cotton Famine. More research images please! Thanks Nog Tow.